Hepatitis A Basics

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A can be prevented with a vaccine. People who get hepatitis A may feel sick for a few weeks to several months but usually recover completely and do not have lasting liver damage. In rare cases, hepatitis A can cause liver failure and even death; this is more common in older people and in people with other serious health issues, such as chronic liver disease.


How common is hepatitis A?

Since the hepatitis A vaccine was first recommended in 1996, cases of hepatitis A in the have declined dramatically. Unfortunately, in recent years the number of people infected has been increasing because there have been multiple outbreaks of hepatitis A. These outbreaks have primarily been from person-to-person contact, especially among people who use drugs, people experiencing homelessness, and men who have sex with men.

Best way to prevent hepatitis A?

Vaccination is the best way to prevent hepatitis A. The hepatitis A vaccine is safe and effective. The vaccine series usually consists of 2 shots, given 6 months apart. Getting both shots provides the best protection against hepatitis A.

How is hepatitis A spread?

 The hepatitis A virus is found in the stool and blood of people who are infected. The hepatitis A virus is spread when someone ingests the virus, usually through:
►Person-to-person contact Hepatitis A can be spread from close, personal contact with an infected person, such as through having sex, caring for someone who is ill, or using drugs with others. Hepatitis A is very contagious, and people can even spread the virus before they feel sick.

►Eating contaminated food or drink Contamination of food with the hepatitis A virus can happen at any point: growing, harvesting, processing, handling, and even after cooking. Contamination of food and water happens more often in countries where hepatitis A is common. Although uncommon, foodborne outbreaks have occurred in the United States from people eating contaminated fresh and frozen imported food products.

International travel and hepatitis A

If you are planning to travel to countries where hepatitis A is common, talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated before you travel. Travelers to urban areas, resorts, and luxury hotels in countries where hepatitis A is common are still at risk. International travelers have been infected, even though they regularly washed their hands and were careful about what they drank and ate.



Book an appointment with PULSE clinic to get vaccination for Hepatitis A

PULSE Clinic has major campuses in Central Hong Kong, Hong Kong island; Central Kuala Lumpur (Bukit Bintang), Malaysia; Center Silom), Bangkok; and Center Sukhumvit, Bangkok, Thailand. For appointment booking and more information, choose your location below:

60/4 Silom Road, Suriyawong, Bangkok

BTS Sala Daeng Exit 3, MRT Silom Exit 2
Tel: +6626525097, +66652371936  

Email: info.silom@pulse-clinic.com

OPEN DAILY  · Mon - Sun·  10AM - 7:00PM   

· Book An Appointment @ Silom ·  


Trendy Building, Sukhumvit 13, Bangkok 

Tel: +6621687459, +66959156385  

Email: info.nana@pulse-clinic.com

OPEN DAILY  ·  10AM - 7:00PM 
· Book An 
Appointment @ Sukhumvit ·


127/2 Ratuthit Songroipi Rd, Pa Tong, Phuket
Tel: +6676633368, +66952615282

Email: info.phuket@pulse-clinic.com

MONDAY  ·  10AM - 7.30PM  Emergency PEP,

                        Refill Medication only 

TUE - SAT  ·  10AM - 7:30PM Full Services 

· Book An Appointment @ Phuket ·  


61A, Jalan Sultan Ismail, Bukit Bintang, 50250
Tel: +60321102122 , +601165388678

Email: info.kl@pulse-clinic.com

MONDAY - FRIDAY  ·  11.00 AM - 07.30 PM

SAT ·  11.00 AM - 05.30 PM

· Book An Appointment  @ Kuala Lumpur ·


2F, 83 Wellington St, Central, Hong Kong
Tel: +85223898250 
Email: info.hk@pulse-clinic.com

                               OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY  ·  11AM-7:30PM
                            · Book An Appointment @ Hong Kong
·  


 

Clients are strictly not allowed to use our address for mailing/shipping purpose.